Tuesday, November 20 2018
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BMI Calculator

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Body Mass Index

"Maintaining a healthy weight will avoid you from various diseases," this gold advice has often you hear from time to time, like a broken record. But glaring at the scales might not be enough. Here is the Body Mass Index (BMI), playing its role.

What is body mass index?

"Body mass index is a good way to assess whether your weight is healthy or not," said Jessica Crandall, RD, certified diabetes educator and national spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Body mass index is the standard metric used to determine who is in the healthy and unhealthy weight group. The body mass index or so-called BMI compares your weight to your height, calculated by dividing the body weight in kilograms by the height in the squared meter.

For example, you want to find out whether you are normal or obese. You have a weight of 80 kilograms and a height of 1.75 m (175 centimeters). 

First, multiply the height in the squares: 1.75 x 1.75 = 3.06. Furthermore, for weight lifting with the result of height squared: 80 / 3.06 = 26.1. Finally, compare your BMI number (26.1) to the weight categories listed below: 

  • Below 18.5 = Weight less
  • 18.5 - 22.9 = Normal weight
  • 23 - 29.9 = Excess body weight (obesity tendency)
  • 30+ up = obesity

That way, your BMI alias body mass index indicates that you are overweight. 

Body mass index can not be an ideal weight gauge

BMI is an easy count method that can provide basic information to your overall weight problem. This figure can act as a warning sign of danger and protect a person from death from chronic diseases associated with obesity. 

BMI is not an ideal and accurate measurement method, nor can it explain the cause of a person's weight problem. When defining healthy weight, a definitive type of measurement can not be applied to all, Dr. Rexford Ahima, professor of medicine from the University of Pennsylvania and co-researcher of the journal Science issue of 2013. 

BMI also does not take into account the amount and distribution of body fat that is important to measure a person's risk of various chronic diseases. The reason, thin people may still have a distended stomach or diabetes. And in some cases, a large high body posture, such as a bodybuilder (who can look like being overweight thanks to his muscle mass), is not necessarily a bad thing; many people who have a weight above "normal" are otherwise healthy. In addition, low BMI rates may be attributable to certain diseases or aging factors. 

BMI also fails to account for ethnic and sex differences (women tend to have more fat mass than men), age, level of physical activity, body composition (how much is the ratio of muscle and body fat), and waist size (waist circumference above- mean is another indicator of obesity and related disease risk). So, for example, as a woman, even if your body mass index is included in the normal category, you can still have a high body fat percentage.

That is, BMI does not fully represent a thorough diagnosis of the health of the body and the risk of one's illness. Consult your physician about your risks and concerns about health conditions related to your weight. 

If you already know what our body mass index is, what can be done? 

Do not just stick to BMIs and numbers on your heavy scales. Note also the muscle mass and waist circumference to provide a more comprehensive summary of your body's general health. Everyone's body is different, therefore BMI is not perfect for universal calculations. 

BMI will be useful as a reference point when used in conjunction with other monitoring devices. Take advantage of BMI calculations and your weight scales - then dig deeper with your doctor to see if you're on the right path to achieving your ideal weight.